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What Happens If I Don’t Make An Lpa?

If you don’t make an LPA, and later become unable to make certain decisions for yourself, there may be a time when no one can legally make decisions for you. This can make things difficult, such as paying bills or care costs, or making decisions about your future care.

If this happens, someone may need to apply to the Court of Protection to become your deputy. This gives them similar powers to that of an attorney. A relative or friend can apply to be your deputy, or a professional may be appointed. The process of becoming a deputy is a lot more time-consuming and expensive than an LPA. A deputy must also do some things on an ongoing basis, such as paying an annual fee and submitting an annual report, so it is usually easier for someone to be an attorney rather than a deputy. Also the court are often reluctant to appoint a deputy to make decisions about your health and welfare.